PI: Richard Feiock, Florida State University and Sunjoo Park, Florida State University 

This study extends previous study of the employment effects of SWMA1988 in four ways. First, it defines and classifies the solid waste management industry by public and private sectors—isolating solid waste collection, recycling processing, and scrap materials industries. Second, it establishes the longitudinal database of Florida’s solid waste and recycling employment at the state, county, and local levels through 2012. Third, it extends the analysis beyond the direct employment effects to examine indirect economic benefits across the supply chain, including recycling based manufacturing industry, waste management facilities construction, reused materials wholesales and merchant businesses. Fourth, it conducts a survey of private recovered materials dealers in Florida to better understand and assist recycling vendors as well as county and states governments in Florida.

We find more growth in private sector than public sector collection and report the strongest job growth in the private solid waste and recycling industry. The survey results reveal that local government communication of programs, and narrow state definitions of recovered materials are perceived as barriers to development. Our regression model estimates indicate a 10 percent increase in the recycling rate produces additional growth in private solid waste and recycling jobs in Florida of 4 percent or more. Thus achieving the 75 percent recycling goal would not only produce tremendous environmental and health benefits to Florida citizens it would add over 3,900 new jobs to this sector to the Florida economy.

This study extends previous study of the employment effects of SWMA1988 in four ways. First, it defines and classifies the solid waste management industry by public and private sectors—isolating solid waste collection, recycling processing, and scrap materials industries. Second, it establishes the longitudinal database of Florida’s solid waste and recycling employment at the state, county, and local levels through 2012. Third, it extends the analysis beyond the direct employment effects to examine indirect economic benefits across the supply chain, including recycling based manufacturing industry, waste management facilities construction, reused materials wholesales and merchant businesses. Fourth, it conducts a survey of private recovered materials dealers in Florida to better understand and assist recycling vendors as well as county and states governments in Florida.We find more growth in private sector than public sector collection and report the strongest job growth in the private solid waste and recycling industry. The survey results reveal that local government communication of programs, and narrow state definitions of recovered materials are perceived as barriers to development. Our regression model estimates indicate a 10 percent increase in the recycling rate produces additional growth in private solid waste and recycling jobs in Florida of 4 percent or more. Thus achieving the 75 percent recycling goal would not only produce tremendous environmental and health benefits to Florida citizens it would add over 3,900 new jobs to this sector to the Florida economy.

 

University of FloridaFlorida international universityUSFMiami UniversityFlorida A&MUCFFlorida StateFAUUniversity of West FloridaFlorida Institute of Technology